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End of the Line

Dead FishThe End of the Line, the first major feature documentary film revealing the impact of overfishing on our oceans, had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in the World Cinema Documentary Competition. Sundance took place in Park City, Utah, January 15-25, 2009.

Eating Sustainable Seafood

The following species are on the official IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature)
Red List of those in danger:

Fish to Avoid

  • Atlantic salmon
  • Atlantic halibut
  • North Sea turbot
  • Hake
  • Plaice (except from the Irish Sea)
  • Monkfish
  • Sea bass (trawler-caught)
  • Skate
  • Shark
  • Swordfish
  • Marlin
  • Tiger prawns (trawler-caught)
  • Tuna (except yellowfin and skipjack)

For further information, see the Marine Conservation Society Fish to Avoid list: www.fishonline.org/advice/avoid/

These are the species that environmentally conscientious fish-lovers should be buying:

Fish to Eat

  • Pacific cod
  • Pacific halibut
  • Pacific salmon
  • Black bream
  • Herring
  • Mackerel
  • Lemon sole
  • Dublin Bay prawns (a.k.a. Langoustines or Scampi)
  • Scallops
  • Mussels
  • Oysters
  • Clams

Where possible, avoid any fish that has been caught by beam trawlers, which cause huge damage to deep-sea ecosystems, and choose those that have been line-caught. Try to ensure that the shellfish on this list have been sustainably harvested, preferably collected by hand by divers, rather than by dredging.

For further information, see the Marine Conservation Society Fish to Eat list: www.fishonline.org/advice/eat/

Source: Marine Conservation Society , www.fishonline.org

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